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TOPIC: basic equiptment
#684
jolie
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basic equiptment 6 Years, 7 Months ago Karma: 1
Hello & I’m interested in trying something new!

Hello from NWPA!

Is it possible to have a thanksgiving resolution? While I am very grateful for the fish I have caught- and am getting pretty confident in wading for walleyes and hitting spring spawning panfish; but I think I need to find some new challenges. The idea is to wrest my attention away from the river tailwaters and its sparse but sometimes rewarding walleyes and come down river some and tie into some of the big carp that I know gather in spots close to home.

I’ve been reading lots about the European float techniques and have become interested- even intrigued. Of course, I would have to do it during the Wrong Month! Carp & sucker are clearly clearing out of many of the shallow margins they stick to half the year… they will briefly show up in the little hotwater spot I know of, then disappear until quite early spring.

… Anyway, Its not like I have never caught a carp. They get in odd moods sometimes and I’ve caught many on both worms and chicken livers. In fact, I’ll never forget one august night after a good rain, when the carp just decided to hit chicken liver with wild abandon. I had a 20”+ carp on Each rod! Fantastic fun trying to hold bring them each in without tangling, and something of a shock when I found out both was carp.

But targeting carp has been something else!... tried a few years back; a LOT of bread and then only a weakly half take (or something)… Anyways I think its time to upgrade my equipment get myself into hair rigs and figure out how to use it. Anyways I’ve been ignoring poor man ‘bonefish’ for quite a while, and now a little more mature, perhaps, and seeking something of a challenge- I’ll be giving it a try.

There’s clearly MORE to this, than just putting bread on a hook. But what is a decent minimum investment in equiptment?? I’ve got a long enough rod/reel. Thinking about some hair rigs, hooks, and perhaps a waggler- but the Europeans have a huge amount of choice, whereas its just not so clear WHAT I need from a good American outfitter, like cabelas… err.. that’s assuming I can get a basic float setup FROM cabelas…

And that’s also assuming that Wagler floats are a good way to go about this. I foresee a couple trips in the early spring near a warm water discharge for carp (and possibly suckers).
 
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#685
carphunter420
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Re:basic equiptment 6 Years, 7 Months ago Karma: 14
Welcome aboard! Equipment can be as simple or complex as you make it. I would suggest starting out with a simple rig and progress from there. When it comes to american tackle suppliers IE Cabelas, Bass pro shops, etc. there isnt alot of choices for carp specific gear available. In fact, almost none. What you can do though is, Check out Some US based Carp tackle suppliers such as www.bigcarptackle.com/store/home.php or scorpiontackle.com/ and see what they offer and you may be able to find similar gear as a substitute that would be effective. These companies have great gear and the products that work. Another helpful tool may be to check out uscarppromagazine.com/uscarppromagazine/Home.html and check out their setups and techniques that you may be able to adopt. Feel free to post any questions you might have.
 
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#686
jolie
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Re:basic equiptment 6 Years, 7 Months ago Karma: 1
ok, I've checked out bigcarp and as I feared, there was a confusing amount of diversity in some things, and nothing in others...

for one, I'm pretty amazed that they don't offer waglers- isn't that the "standard" approach.. and there are a LOT of kinds of hair rigs in several sizes...but rather than nick-pick through what they have and don't, could I ask a simpler question.

if you had 30$ (or less) on hand for tackle. what would you specifically buy? the plan is to fish with canned corn and bread- and use one of the easier 'recipes' for groundbait.

If you can cast off any big-time lucrative product endorsements, and just boil it down to a few must-haves, I most appreciate it.

They should have a 'beginners' tacklebox for novice, dummies like me
 
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#687
jolie
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Re:basic equiptment 6 Years, 7 Months ago Karma: 1
It occurred to me that to properly recommend an effective technique (with the right tackle) you'd need to know something about the water I plan to fish.

The plan is to fish the heck out of a warm water discharge once the river discharge goes down.

the warm water discharge is broken into three parts... first a stretch of fast, rocky water above forms when just after a pipe of warm water, (aproximately 80*F) falls into a little stream.
the flow next goes over a little concrete wall and heads towards an oil boom. There's moderate current with a 5' deep spot along the boom's concrete support.
Lastly, It goes under the boom and slows down over a mud flat. One side is pretty deep say 6', and there is a slow eddy in this little cove as it meets the river. at the river itself the cove empties out into the tail end of a river hole.

I have seen carp from the small stream above the pipe all the way down to deep in the river itself. They seem to most like wallowing along the mud flat- but they don't act to active in that reach. The middle section, espacially along the oil boom, is where I've concentrated my efforts before and I've had little luck.

it seems to me, you might have to use a slightly diferent float-rig in each spot; but if you could steer me to something fairly basic, I'd appreciate it.
 
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#688
jolie
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Re:basic equiptment 6 Years, 7 Months ago Karma: 1
right so I already have a few questions out there... but with a description of the spot I plan on fishing I realized I had lots more

just your luck! but if you wouldn't mind- could you look over my description of the spot and give me an idea how to approach this?..

would I use the same rig for each part of this pool? Would I be more likely to find active carp in the faster water? And how do I know the most productive place to chum?? How Does the fact that these carp have never been chummed play into my technique??

all those would be very handy to know.

anyways, I think this is all tied together... once I know; what techniques are appropriate for the described spot, and I get a sense of whether each hole holds catchable carp (or whether carp in one of these places are less likely to be catchable)-- than I'd know what to buy, and I could also pick a good spot "to set up the swim".. (If I'm getting the right meaning of the phrase).

Sincerely
 
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#691
carphunter420
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Re:basic equiptment 6 Years, 7 Months ago Karma: 14
I'm going to give you the simplest approach to this possible so here it is...when it comes to rivers, usually carp will hang out and feed in places that the current naturaly deposits food such as the slow muddy flat or cove you mentioned. In the faster sections the food source does not have a chance to land on the bottom and carp don't want to chase their food down stream. They also don't want to battle the current as it much easier for them to be lazy in the slower sections and eddies. They may also use the structures for a current break. If you can fish the backside of the concrete supports that may also be worth a try. I would suggest first trying the slower flat/eddies area.
With that being said lets talk about baits...I would go for the canned corn first. My favorite is "Green Giant Super Sweet Yellow and White" It's a bit more costly than others but the kernals are fat and firm and the carp really seem to like it. Bread is ok but very difficult to keep on hook after a while in the rivers current. I like the corn much better.
When it comes to chumming, before you start fishing, throw 2-3 handfuls of corn just upsteam up where you will be placing your hookbait. This will allow it to flow down and hopefully settle on your spot. Repeat chum every couple fish caught or couple hours.
Now for rigs...I dont think a waggler or float is you best option on a river. A simple sliding setup works great for carp. Use a #6 or #4 hook attached to 6"-8" leader and barrel swivel with a 1/2 - 1 oz. egg sinker above the swivel. This will allow line to pull through the sinker and the carp will not feel the weight. Depending on the current flow use the lightest weight you can get away with while keeping the bait pinned to the bottom. Place 3-4 kernals of corn on hook making sure it is completely covered no hook is exposed for the carp to feel when he sucks it up. This will keep the bait in the carps mouth longer giving you better chance for hookup. Use the highest quality hooks you can afford since carp are very powerful they will easily break an inferior hook. Gamakatsu is a pretty reliable brand that is available most anywhere. In this type of rigs I like the octopus hooks. they seem to really hook and hold well.
Resist the temptation to cast a mile and keep your casts fairly close to the shore(5-15 yds) Carp usually cruise close to the shoreline and at the shorter distance, will be easier to detect strikes.
Unlike the hair rig, which basically starts the hook penetration and results in the carp running and further hooking themselves, this type of rig requires you to detect the most subtle bite and set the hook at the correct moment. You usually will not get so much as a twitch on the rod tip so dont expect it to be like catfishing...I like to hold the rod and place the line as it comes of the reel on the edge of my finger. This will allow you to feel every little "tap" or "bump" which is what it will feel like. When a carp mouthes your hookbait, you will feel a tap tap on your line and often will feel a slight movement as the carp tries to move off. This is when you want to set the hook. It takes a bit of practice to determine the correct timing of setting the hook. Sometimes you want to wait till the fish moves off and the line starts to tighten and other times it will be right after the first bump. Using a braided line or flourocarbon will drastically increase the sensitivity you can feel but mono will work, just not as sensitive.
Try fishing a particular spot for a couple hours and if no sign of a bite, try another spot. Location is key, so dont be afraid to move.
I hope I covered it all...lol If not and you have any more questions just let me know.
 
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